CLOSE
Loading...
12° Nicosia,
26 October, 2021
 
Home  /  News

The invasion of the tropical fish in Cyprus

The consequences of climate change

Shemaine Bushnell Kyriakides

According to the Daily Telegraph, the warming of the Mediterranean Sea and the widening of the Suez Canal are causing non-native fish to enter and thrive in Cyprus waters.

Around 800 new species have made their way from the Indian Ocean via the Suez Canal and are now thriving in the waters of Cyprus.
They include parrot fish, the Red Sea goat fish, the dusky spinefoot, trumpet fish and new species of sea urchins.

Local fisherman are calling it a “disaster”. Some species, the lagocephalos for one, are aggressive and devour other fish in nets.

Other species such as the venomous lagocephalos (or puffer fish) and the lionfish have also made their way into coastal waters.

Local fisherman are calling it a “disaster”. Some species, the lagocephalos for one, are aggressive and devour other fish in nets.

According to one local diver, catches of lionfish around the Cavo Grecko area have been steadily increasing for the last 2 years. And, although venomous, are quite delicious after they have been thoroughly cleaned and prepared.

It may be the solution to the overfishing that has led to the decline of native species. 70% of the seafood in Cyprus is imported.

Ultimately, these new arrivals can no longer be eradicated. Experts point out that the marine fauna in Cyprus and in the rest of the Mediterranean is gradually changing, with more and more tropical fish appearing and dominating.

According to the World Wide Fund for Nature, the Mediterranean is essentially turning into a tropical sea, which is a reminder of the dangers of climate change.

TAGS
Cyprus  |  fish  |  lagocephalos

News: Latest Articles

X