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22 February, 2024
 
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$280B lost in fraud and mismanagement of US Covid relief aid

Massive fraud in US COVID-19 relief efforts reveal a $280 billion potential loss and $123 billion wasted or misused

A recent investigation conducted by the Associated Press has exposed a rampant wave of fraud and mismanagement in the distribution of federal COVID-19 relief aid in the United States. Shockingly, fraudsters potentially pilfered more than $280 billion, while an additional $123 billion was wasted or misspent, accounting for approximately 10% of the $4.2 trillion disbursed by the government.

The ease with which criminals exploited the system was attributed to the lack of oversight and relaxed restrictions implemented during the early stages of the pandemic. The urgency to disburse funds quickly led to minimal scrutiny of applicants, creating an environment ripe for exploitation. The government has since charged over 2,230 individuals with pandemic-related fraud crimes and continues to conduct thousands of investigations.

The majority of the stolen funds were siphoned from three major relief initiatives launched during the Trump administration and continued under President Joe Biden. These programs aimed to provide assistance to small businesses and unemployed workers grappling with the economic fallout caused by the pandemic. However, the thefts were not limited to large-scale operations. Individuals from various backgrounds, including a U.S. soldier in Georgia, former pastors of a Texas church, a former state lawmaker in Missouri, and a roofing contractor in Montana, were all implicated in the fraudulent schemes.

The Small Business Administration (SBA), which assumed a critical role in managing two substantial relief efforts—the COVID-19 Economic Injury Disaster Loan and Paycheck Protection programs—fell prey to scams due to expedited processes and lax verifications. The agency faced an immense challenge as it struggled to disburse over a trillion dollars to struggling businesses and employees in a remarkably short time frame. As a result, safeguards designed to protect federal funds were compromised, with applicants allowed to "self-certify" their eligibility. The CARES Act also initially barred the SBA from conducting thorough checks, further enabling fraudulent and undeserving individuals to receive funds. Only later in 2020 were these restrictions reversed.

The SBA's inspector general estimated that fraud in the COVID-19 economic injury disaster loan program amounted to $86 billion, with an additional $20 billion in fraudulent claims identified in the Paycheck Protection Program. However, revised figures are expected to show significantly higher losses. A study from the University of Texas at Austin suggested that suspicious loans under the Paycheck Protection Program alone could reach up to $117 billion.

The Biden administration has implemented stricter measures to combat pandemic fraud, including utilizing the "Do Not Pay" Treasury Department database to identify ineligible recipients. Additionally, President Biden has proposed a $1.6 billion plan to enhance law enforcement efforts in pursuing pandemic relief fraudsters.

While the scale of the relief package was unprecedented, critics argue that insufficient precautions and oversight led to substantial losses. The debate on the effectiveness of the relief spending and assigning blame for the thefts continue among lawmakers on Capitol Hill. Efforts are underway to increase the statute of limitations for pandemic-related fraud crimes, allowing prosecutors more time to investigate and pursue cases.

The revelations of massive fraud and mismanagement have cast a shadow over the government's response to the pandemic. As the nation grapples with the aftermath of COVID-19, efforts to address and rectify the extensive financial losses incurred by the relief aid schemes remain ongoing.

[With information from AP]

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