CLOSE
Loading...
12° Nicosia,
06 December, 2022
 
Home  /  News

Op-ed: On the doorstep of an unknown world

'For the first time the possibility of a Union with a common foreign policy and defense is emerging'

Nikos Konstandaras

Nikos Konstandaras

We are Witnesses of the end of the world we knew, without knowing where we will be in a short time. The Russian invasion of Ukraine has provoked such a rift among the members of the European Union, such a major shift in German policy, that for the first time the possibility of a Union with a common foreign policy and defense is emerging.

The isolation of Moscow, Vladimir Putin's failure to properly interpret the situation before going to war, and the apparent weakness of the system he set up hit Russia to the extent that even its worst enemy could not succeed. The "West" reappears as an existing concept, deriving legitimacy from Putin's behavior, while the nakedness of the regime he built and the absurdity of the policy he pursued for so many years show that his greatest victim is the Russian people. A people who today see that the deprivation of their democratic rights has not translated into security or stability. The bigger picture, however, is not limited to today's protagonists - the drama unfolds under the threat of nuclear catastrophe and concerns us all.

The bigger picture, however, is not limited to today's protagonists - the drama unfolds under the threat of nuclear catastrophe and concerns us all.

Will we be fortunate to see a strong European Union capable of ensuring the stability and prosperity of all the peoples of the troubled continent, or are Russia's institutions and all its security systems so eroded that they would not prevent a self-destructive move?

The signs are not good: the invasion, with the poor execution of an inadequate plan, shows either that Putin's staff is incompetent or that he is imposing a policy that cannot be implemented. In both cases, he is responsible. As he will be responsible if the attack intensifies and more and more dead civilians start appearing on the screens, which are in the hands of almost every inhabitant of the Earth.

The war today is not only being waged on the field, but in world public opinion. Thus, the Russians have already been defeated. Putin is in the corner. One week ago, few would have thought that the Ukrainian crisis could raise the threat of nuclear weapons. Today, it is difficult to rule out a move of madness by a man who is playing the future of his country on a roll.

The global mobilization against Russia (with a few exceptions, and with China anxious) is an unexpected step in support of the international system of government. Now that the wall has been erected, we need a way out through negotiations. As difficult as this may seem today, we are in an infinitely better position for diplomacy than we would be if a nuclear war broke out or a global recession was triggered by prolonged hostilities and sanctions. As necessary as the heroic resistance of the Ukrainians is, so is the truce.

[This article was translated from its Greek original]

TAGS
Cyprus  |  Ukraine  |  Russia

News: Latest Articles

Tatar irked by Menendez's comments

Tatar irked by Menendez's comments

According to Tatar, 'the whole world should know that the occupier in Cyprus is the Greek-Greek Cypriot duo who turned the ...
Kathimerini Greece Newsroom
 |  NEWS
X